Tag Archives: feelings

What Makes Me…Me by Anne Baldwin and Levi Baldwin (Book Review)

Picture

 
What Makes Me…Me is a story about harnessing your super powered brain. We are all special and unique and our differences are what make us all special. What Makes Me…Me was written especially for those kids with neurological differences, their families, and their friends.
 
 
BUY THE BOOK:
Amazon ~ indiebound
add to goodreads
 
 
 
 
I received a complimentary copy of this book from iRead Book Tours. I voluntarily chose to read and post an honest review.
 
Children, like adults, vary in their outside appearances, their genetic make-up, and how their body functions. Some people are shy, while others are talkative. Some like sports while others prefer video games. Some have soft voices, and others people have loud voices. These differences make us unique. 

People’s brains also behave differently. Some people have little or no control over thoughts and impulses. Their body moves at will. They might appear bouncy. Anne Baldwin and Levi Baldwin (co-authors) were correct when they said teachers sometimes get mad at students for their lack of attention or the inability to remain seated. The reality is that their brains make it difficult for them to sit quietly. That doesn’t mean they are less intelligent! More educators need to remember this fact. 


What Makes Me…Me by Anne Baldwin and Levi Baldwin reminds and educates people that a child whose brain might be different can still be brave, kind, intelligent, and capable of loving their family and friends. I also love the part where the child said he would not let the “labels” define him. He also didn’t care what others thought of him and his tics. Brilliant message! Pass that one along! 


QBN Studios did a fantastic job bringing the story to life. Every image was remarkably drawn, even the image with the brain and heart. It was gross or overly medical-looking. It was simple and complimented the text just right. 


What Makes Me…Me recommended reading: 3-7-year-olds 
Content Rating: G -Suitable for everyone. 
Page length: 34 pages

 
 
Heart Rating System:
1 (lowest) and 5 (highest) 
Score: 
❤❤
 
 
 
 
 
 
Meet the Author:
Author Anne Baldwin

 
Anne Baldwin is a wife, mom, and fierce advocate for neurodiverse kids. Anne wrote her first book What Makes Me…Me after her son Levi was diagnosed with Tourette Syndrome. Passionate about stopping the stigma around Tourette-Syndrome, Anne hopes that her books about embracing your differences as what makes you unique will help kids with Tourette Syndrome, ADHD, and other neurological disorders to feel included and accepted by everyone. Anne lives in metro-Detroit with her husband Nick, their sons Levi and Gus, 3 cats, a dog, and a leopard gecko. 

connect with the author:  website instagram

 
 
 

 

 

 

Leave a Comment

Filed under Uncategorized

Greedy the Crow: Finders Keepers – Teaching Values to Children in a Fun Way by Mother Melania Salem (Book Review)

GREEDY THE CROW: FINDERS KEEPERS by Mother Melania
​Greedy the Crow’s greedy ways are going to get him in trouble! Will anybody help him?

Amazon
add to goodreads

 

 


I received a complimentary copy of this book from iRead Book Tours. I voluntarily chose to read and post an honest review.

 

When our children are very young, we begin teaching them about fire safety. We teach them the dangers of playing with matches or lighters, what to do if a fire starts (escape route/meet point), and what happens if you catch on fire (stop, drop and roll). 

Greedy the Crow: Finders Keepers – Teaching Values to Children in a Fun Way by Mother Melania Salem teaches children some helpful ways you can make your home safe from fires and what to do if a fire starts. 

 

Examples: 

Water and mow your lawn to prevent fires because tall, dry grass can easily catch on fire. 

Don’t block doorways and windows with trash because those are your potential escape exits. 

Have several escape routes because you never know where a fire might start or what exits are blocked. 

Get out quickly! 

All good points and solid advice!

 

Amazon has the recommended reading age of 3 – 8 years for Greedy the Crow: Finders Keepers – Teaching Values to Children in a Fun Way. I don’t think most 3-year-olds will be able to read this story yet, but 8-year-olds should be able to, for the most part. There might be a few words that might trip them up. 

No matter the age, though, every child will learn something through the text and very realistic illustrations by Cayce Grace Kruse. 

Special note: Greedy the Crow: Finders Keepers – Teaching Values to Children in a Fun Way contains a link to worksheets, which include a vocabulary page and vocabulary quiz. Check them out! 

 

 

Heart Rating System:
1 (lowest) and 5 (highest) 
Score: 
❤❤

Amazon
add to goodreads

 

 

 

Meet the Author:

Mother Melania is the Abbess of Holy Assumption Monastery in Calistoga, CA. She grew up in a house that always had tons of children around, her poor parents had to read to her till they were hoarse, and from the moment she learned to read, she always had her nose in a book. So, it was only natural for her to grow up to write children’s books. In her books, she strives to teach virtue in a fun, non-preachy way.
 
 

 

 

 

1 Comment

Filed under Uncategorized

I Celebrate My Voice by Nonku Kunene Adumetey (Book Review)

I CELEBRATE MY VOICE by Nonku Kunene Adumetey
 
I Celebrate My Voice is a fun and lovely introduction to what it means to use your voice. With breathtaking illustrations, this book shows young children how limitless their voices are. It doesn’t matter who you are or where you come from – you have a voice and it matters.
 
 
Buy the Book:
Amazon ~ B&N
 
 
 
 
 
I received a complimentary copy of this book from iRead Book Tours. I voluntarily chose to read and post an honest review.
 
 
I love books that promote positivity, and I Celebrate My Voice by Nonku Kunene Adumetey does this from beginning to end. Every page encourages our youth to express themselves, help others, show their talents and skills, spread kindness, and much more. Nonku even states animals use their voice to communicate in many ways. She doesn’t go into specifics, though, since this is a story about humans, not animals, using their voices. 


Illustrations: Mary K. Biswas made 2-dimension characters appear almost 3-dimensional. I loved the diversity in character development in race and gender. One child utilized crutches, but I longed to see one in a wheelchair since many children spend most of their lives in one. According to my daughter, some faces/heads seemed too big and long for a child’s body. Yeah, I can see her point. We both loved all the bold colors. Very eye-catching! 


If you’re on the fence about buying the kindle or print edition of  I Celebrate My Voice, maybe this following tidbit will sway your choice. After the story,  Nonku Kunene Adumetey has included a “trace and color” page and a “How do you celebrate your voice?” color sheet with dotted lines for your child’s response. 


Recommended age group: ages 3-7


Some text will be challenging for young readers to read by themselves. When the adult reads the story, there might be a few words young children won’t understand, and they will need to be defined: gracefully and steadily, as examples. 


I highly recommend all parents/librarians/teachers add this story to their bookshelf! 

 

Heart Rating System:
1 (lowest) and 5 (highest) 
Score: ❤❤
 
Buy the Book:
Amazon ~ B&N
 
 
 
 
 
Meet the Author:

Picture

Nonkululeko Kunene Adumetey (also known as Nonku) is an award-winning author, loving wife and devoted mother of two happy toddlers. Her children both love singing, story time, and tasting home-cooked cuisines. When Nonku tastes delicious food, she hums a blissful tune, which she never realized until both her children started humming along.

Nonku was born in the Kingdom of Eswatini, where she lived until she was 16. She left to complete high school in Canada and later moved to the United States to pursue her college education.

Her passion is to inspire her children and all children to celebrate who they are, understand their differences are beautiful, know their diversity is a strength, and believe their voices are should be heard.

Her hero is her late father, Themba Micah Kunene, a man from humble beginnings who worked tirelessly to provide a full life for his eight children. Her father’s unconditional love, wisdom, selflessness, and work ethic inspire the core of Nonku’s principles and life mottos. One of his favorite mottos was “umtsentse uhlaba usamila”, a saying about a strong grass that gets deeply rooted during its early stages of development. The essence of this saying embodies the core of early intervention and teaching young minds early so that they grow up strong and informed about the world. This is what inspires Nonku to write children’s book, to inspire and empower young minds for a greater future.   

 

connect with the author: 
website ~ facebook instagram ~ goodreads

 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Leave a Comment

Filed under Uncategorized

I Miss School by Ryan Reaves (Book Review)


“I Miss School” is written by a child, for a child. In this heartwarming and honest story, kids will understand that their feelings about the pandemic are normal and it is perfectly acceptable to feel a range of emotions related to not going to in-person school. The book instills hope for kids that brighter days are ahead.
 
 
 
 
 I received a complimentary copy of this book from iRead Book Tours. I voluntarily chose to read and post an honest review.
 
 
I Miss School will strike a chord with young readers/listeners because many children have spent this year attending class from their kitchen tables. 


I Miss School touched my heart because these thoughts belong to a real-life six-year-old—a child who also happens to be the author. As a parent of a tween daughter, I know the lack of interaction has negatively affected my child. Like Ryan, she misses her teachers, eating lunch with her friends, and every fun activity they did at school.


This pandemic has been brutal on all of us, but especially young children. 


For so long, children could not hang out due to the fear of catching covid-19. Facetime and Zoom calls are nice, but most kids crave in-person interactions. 


I encourage all parents/caregivers of young children to sit down and read I Miss School with your little ones. Maybe they’ll share with feelings with you if they haven’t already. 


As I am writing this review, covid vaccines are not readily available for Ryan’s age group, but I hope it will be soon. I hate to see any child sad— real or in character form. As for the characters, the illustrations were beautifully drawn. I couldn’t locate the illustrator’s name, but whoever you are, I commend you on your artistic ability. 


Nice job, Ryan Reaves! You, my dear, are a superstar! 

 
Heart Rating System:
1 (lowest) and 5 (highest) 
Score: ❤❤❤
 
 
 
Meet the Author:
Author Ryan Reaves
Six-year-old Ryan Reaves began writing her debut story “I Miss School” at five years old after yearning to return to her brick-and-mortar school during the covid 19 pandemic. She wanted to write the book for other kids, so they knew they weren’t alone in their thoughts and feelings and that we are all in this together.

connect with the author: instagram

 

Leave a Comment

Filed under Uncategorized