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The Eight Parts of Speech: Grammar 1 – Interactive Workbook by Lori Harvill Moore (Book Review)

This downloadable interactive workbook allows students in fourth grade and higher to learn about the eight parts of speech, which is an integral segment of a language arts curriculum. Students in traditional and home school settings will learn in three ways: watch a video, read chapter text, and complete exercises to reinforce rules and concepts of English grammar.

The student clicks on text at the beginning of a chapter to open a video. Then, if the device does not allow for completing the exercises by filling in the blanks in the workbook, the student can click on a link within the description of each exercise and provide answers online.

Requirements

The device, which can be a tablet or a desktop Kindle application, must have Internet access to take advantage of the interactive features.

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I received a complimentary copy of this book from Reedsy Discovery. 
I voluntarily chose to read and post an honest review.

 

The first chapter, “Nouns,” like the other six chapters, defines the term, gives examples of various types, and allows the reader to complete multiple exercises in the book or online through an external link. There are plenty of opportunities for the student to practice writing sentences in the covered area. Lori Harvill Moore has also provided an answer key at the back of the book. So, when in doubt, look at her guide! 

Each chapter title represents a term children will become familiar with in elementary school: nouns, pronouns, verbs, adjectives, adverbs, prepositions, and conjunctions and interjections (the last set combined into one chapter). While the chapter titles are vague, each section’s contents are very detailed. Tables and examples help take the guesswork out of (what might call) a difficult language. My only issue with the tables was their readability. In the digital format (EPUB), some text was hard to read: for example, the chart under “Prepositions About Locations.” 

The Eight Parts of Speech by Lori Harvill Moore is a perfect book to teach the fundamentals of parts of speech and also to use as a reference guide throughout your academic years. If you’re a visual person, again, I want to remind you this book has several links that will redirect you to tutorials. These links would benefit a single learner or be utilized in a classroom. 

The Eight Parts of Speech by Lori Harvill Moore is a perfect interactive workbook for fourth graders and up who are learning new concepts or need a refreshing course on parts of speech. All the exercises would be great practice questions to reinforce a lesson or to use in test prep. 

Whether you attend public school or homeschool, I recommend you share The Eight Parts of Speech by Lori Harvill with your student(s).

Review submitted to Reedsy on 10/31/22.

Heart Rating System:
1 (lowest) and 5 (highest) 
Score: ❤❤

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Meet the Author


Lori: I have been writing for three decades, both as a freelancer and as a function of my job duties. I am an avid proponent of literacy for children and adults and am working on six grammar and composition eBooks. Among my writing credits are two eBooks for Bookboon.com and two eBooks for children.

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Of Demon Kind: A Forbidden Romance Fantasy (Kingdom of Jior Fantasy Series Book 1) by Wendy L. Anderson (Book Review)

He’s heir to a dark throne. She’s a gentle healer. Will their forbidden attraction be the key to mending his broken soul?

Prince Lorn just wants to be left alone. Drinking heavily to numb the despair of failing to prevent his evil father’s horrific defeat and his own inability to conquer the humans, the devastated half-demon has spent the last five years exiled in a drunken stupor. But when he’s falsely accused of kidnapping a beautiful noble and other atrocities, he emerges vowing to fight to clear his name…by becoming her white knight.

Princess Lililaira longs to be free. Imprisoned in a sorcerer’s tower, the courageous woman is startled when a gorgeous winged man flies in through the window and offers rescue. Seizing the opportunity to escape, she places her trust in the fierce warrior’s arms in a daring flight to freedom.

Desperate to avert another brutal war, Lorn draws nearer to his lovely companion while wrestling with the sins of his past. And though Lililaira is happy to help her intriguing savior prove his innocence in return for his aid in evading her cruel father’s rule, her growing love demands she stand beside him as they set off into an unknown future.

Can they break away from eternal torment and claim their destiny together?

Of Demon Kind is the thrilling first book in the Kingdom of Jior romantic fantasy series. If you like brooding anti-heroes, chivalrous passions, and epic medieval battles, then you’ll adore Wendy L. Anderson’s magical tale.

Buy Of Demon Kind to witness the redemption of a twisted birthright today!

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I received a complimentary copy of this book from R&R Book Tours.
I voluntarily chose to read and post an honest review.


Of Demon Kind 
housed many scenes that must be brought to life in a full-color, live-action film. For instance:

  • Thousand black spears pointed skyward.
  • One thousand demons’ eyes glowed green.
  • Giant fireballs streaked the night sky.
  • Long awaited showdown (final battle scene)

Prince Lorn and Princess Lililaira’s union happened over winter and was expected. No offense, but falling for your rescuer and vice versa has been done repeatedly in many TV, print, and movie. But it wasn’t how they ended up in the cave that interested me. No, it was how her “kiss” could keep death from taking Loren after poison-tipped arrows struck him. The mystery of the princess and her magic powers drew my attention. 

Love found Lorn, but his mission was never far from his mind. He needed to find the Dark Sorcerer and ask why this person was using his family’s name, crest, and uniforms/colors to wreak havoc across the lands. He also needed to return Lily to her home. As you can imagine, neither task proved uneventful, and hooray for that. 

The Dark Sorcerer’s identity, intentions, and shocking truths were delivered in dramatic format. I knew the first (identity), but what the evil one disclosed (shocking truth) was a nice plot twist. (Figured out some of the revelations, but not all)

While I longed to see battle scenes embellished more, the final paragraphs show promise that the next book in the series would deliver us an epic battle scene, maybe more than one. 

 

Heart Rating System:
1 (lowest) and 5 (highest) 
Score: 

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Meet the Author

Wendy L. Anderson is a writer of passionately charged fantasy. Breaking the barriers of typical fantasy themes, she created the Kingdom of Jior epic fantasy series, a lusty and poetic five-book series that will have you wanting more in her Legends of Everclearing spinoff series. Inspired by authors such as Robert E. Howard and Morgan Llywelyn, Wendy went on to write three other stand-alone works; A Cut Twice as Deep, Ulrik, and Rapunzel’s Tower. These fantasy works break free from the usual boundaries of fantasy genres.

A Colorado native and mother of two; she has decided it is time to write down the fantasies from her mind. Writing about everything from fantastical worlds to the stuff of her dreams she takes her stories along interesting paths while portraying characters and worlds she sees in her mind’s eye. Her goal is to deviate from common themes, write in original directions and transport her reader to the worlds of her creation.

Wendy L. Anderson’s fantasy has action, adventure, and suspense with just the right amount of romance!

Find out more at: www.wendylanderson.com

 

Finalist in the 2022 Colorado Author’s League Awards for Rapunzel’s Tower

3rd Place Winner! Romance Writers of America Write Touch Readers; award 2020-Of Demon Kind

Finalist in the 2020 Write Touch Readers’ Award Contest

Honorable mention Great Northwest Book Contest

 

 

 

 

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The Early Life of Becky Bexley the Child Genius by Diana Holbourn (Book Review)

It can be frustrating being a child genius. Grown-ups are always telling kids what to do and what to think – but it’s harder with Becky Bexley! Unbelievable things happen in this funny story! She can talk from the moment she’s born! Her mum thinks she’s going crazy when she hears her! And Becky has soooo many questions – for the doctor, the priest and her poor mum! And she has one or two suggestions as well… but will they listen?

The Early Life of Becky Bexley the Child Genius is a fun and comical story about what it’s like to be a kid in a grown-up world, and why children’s voices should always be heard.

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I received a complimentary copy of this book from Reedsy Discovery. I voluntarily chose to read and post an honest review.

 

Imagine if you heard your newborn speak on day one. Imagine if they said more than one word but a string of words. You’d be flabbergasted. Doctors and nurses would be baffled by this medical miracle. Jaws would be hitting the floor, and minds would be blown!

Becky Bexley came into this world, and mere seconds later, she spoke complete, coherent sentences. Becky was a humourous newborn. “That’s better. But what’s this ‘milk’ stuff I’ve heard you raving about, saying you’ll give me some? Let’s try it” (Becky 2). Becky amused me when she complained about only being served milk. Her mom explained why she couldn’t eat like her yet. Becky’s workaround was hilarious. “Tell you what: Eat foods with very strong flavours, and then maybe the flavours will come out in your milk; it’ll still be milk, but it’ll be a bit more similar to the foods you’re eating” (7-8). Becky’s ingenious idea worked! 

With newfound success with her milky experiment, Becky had another weird but kind of brilliant idea. She wanted her mom her label her what’s today’s flavor. So weird but so comical!

Medical professionals, educators, and those not in either field were in disbelief the baby was talking. The comedic scenes were overflowing and had me laughing non-stop. The dialogue coming from Becky was hilarious. 

Becky was not like your typical baby. She talked way, way early. Read early. She started school when most babies were still nursing. When most children learned to speak, she corrected other people’s speech. She could play the piano without a professional lesson. At ten, she was ready to attend a university. Becky reminded me of Sheldon from the hit tv show Young Sheldon

As an American, I wasn’t familiar with “A-levels.” Wikipedia informed me, “The A Level (Advanced Level) is a subject-based qualification conferred as part of the General Certificate of Education, as well as a school leaving qualification offered by the educational bodies in the United Kingdom and the educational authorities of British Crown dependencies to students completing secondary or pre-university education.[1] They were introduced in England and Wales in 1951 to replace the Higher School Certificate.” I don’t think most children will encounter any other UK jargon that might be foreign to them. 

There weren’t many images in the story, but the ones added were perfect and captured key moments in the story perfectly. The 1/2 donkey and 1/2 elephant image was very creative. The look on the hybrid animal amused me. 

The Early Life of Becky Bexley the Child Genius is a chapter book best suited for upper elementary grades and middle-school students. It’s a comedic story that I think children would love to see animated for television. 

 

Heart Rating System:
1 (lowest) and 5 (highest) 
Score: ❤❤❤

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Meet the Author

Diana Holbourn: I’ve written books as a hobby for several years, but am only now getting them self-published. The first one’s just a bit of fun that I started after a niece of mine asked if I’d write something on a blog she had, and I had the idea of writing a funny story that made believe she was a child genius.

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Seekers: The Winds of Change by Troy Knowlton (Book Review)

After an assassination attempt that could lead to an all-out war, Tyras and Oren, two young Seekers of the Argan Empire, are each given secret missions in an attempt to thwart the coming chaos. Both tasks require the Seekers to venture through the war-torn continent of Tiarna where the young men face mortal danger, horrible monsters, and hostile groups – all challenges Seekers are trained to combat. Luckily, the two Seekers also find guidance, friendship, and romance along the way. However, powerful and mysterious forces are conspiring behind the scenes and both Tyras and Oren will have to overcome a host of obstacles, including their own inner demons, in order to maintain a glimmer of hope for success. With war imminent and the unknown ahead, will the Seekers triumph, or will they be swallowed by the turbulent, relentless Winds of Change?

Set in a new, masterfully created high fantasy world, Seekers: The Winds of Change is perfect for fans of An Ember in the Ashes by Sabaa Tahir and We Free the Stars by Hafsah Faisal.

 

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The Winds of Change by Troy Knowlton is advertised as a teen and YA fantasy book, but I think many adults will find this an exhilarating read. It did not lack action sequences. Various weaponry was used in battle: swords, arrows, cannons, bombs, and spears. Tyras and his fellow travelers faced dangers from humans, but they also had to face off against creatures. While the giant lizard (Widower) and scorpions (Barbarians’ mode of transportation in battle) would be frightening to encounter, I found the guglanni terrified me the most. They can eat through metal cages. Imagine what these oversized worms could do to a human bone. They are the stuff of nightmares! Plus, worms are just gross. 

This story did have life-and-death situations and multiple losses, but it also has romance. The scenes are not graphic, but I would suggest a parent read this book first to ensure their child won’t have an issue with the more intimate settings. As I stated in my opening sentence, this book is written with YA and teens in mind, but every child’s comfort zone is different. 

I know this book is a fantasy book, but I did have an issue with how the aftereffects of altercations were handled. For the most part, people got over severe injuries rather swiftly. I wouldn’t like to see the injuries restrict their ability to perform at their peak in the next battle. The pace of the book also seemed to have one speed. It was one life-and-death encounter after another, which is fine if that’s what you like. 

If you like fantasy books with a hint of romance, action, strong female characters, and quick-paced with surprising plot twists, please consider picking up The Winds of Change by Troy Knowlton! 

 

Heart Rating System:
1 (lowest) and 5 (highest) 
Score: 

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About the Author

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Troy Knowlton always had a burning desire to tell stories. He started at a young age by drawing maps of made-up continents and fantasy kingdoms. The empty kingdoms beckoned to be given life, and his work eventually blossomed, leading him to create full narratives and characters for his worlds. He currently lives in California where he works as an X-Ray technologist and teacher when he isn’t writing. He’s also a great lover of history, currently working to earn his bachelor’s degree in History and Political Science.

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Let’s Celebrate Being Different by Lainey Dee (Book Review)

Todd is different from all the other animals -with the head of a bird, the tummy of a bear and the legs of a tiger and he feels he doesn’t quite fit in anywhere! His family love him dearly but it’s hard for him to make friends.

During a visit to his grandmother’s, Todd express’s his concern and she tells him: ‘It’s okay to be different’.

Instilled with new confidence he sets out for the Friday Club, a place where all the animals gather and socialise with their friends. Will he find the courage to face his fears and embrace his differences?

He might be surprised to find some friends along the way! More importantly can he learn to accept himself?

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I received a complimentary copy of this book from Reedsy Discovery. I voluntarily chose to read and post an honest review.

 

“Todd is different from all the other animals -with the head of a bird, the tummy of a bear, and the legs of a tiger and he feels he doesn’t quite fit in anywhere! His family loves him dearly but it’s hard for him to make friends.” Since children probably have no idea how babies are created, they might not even question how a bird and a bear could make a baby together. But, if your child asks about the logistics, I’d say it’s a make-believe story, and it’s not possible in real life. 

Like so many others, Todd has traits that make them appear different from others. Todd’s grandma told him being different is okay, and she was correct. Many children can relate to Todd’s feelings regarding his uniqueness and what happens when others make a public spectacle of them. We should not point, stare, or cause others to feel sad, ashamed, or embarrassed about themselves. Kids are inquisitive, so if they make someone uncomfortable by asking questions about the other person’s body or condition, teach them always to apologize as Charlie did in the story. 

Animals come in different shapes, sizes, and coloring, and no two look identical. Humans also vary in size, shape, and color. Let’s Celebrate Being Different by Lainey Dee teaches children to accept those different from them and accept themselves for who they are! Two great messages! 

Let’s Celebrate Being Different mentions that Todd has no friends, and grandma claims it might be because he is homeschooled. I’ve known several homeschooling parents whom all say the lack of social interaction is a significant obstacle. Todd went to the local community center to meet his peers. Most libraries have events for children to interact with individuals their age. I would suggest speaking to your local library if they provide such events for the community.

The recommended reading age is 4-8. The overall story fits well in this age bracket. Depending on geographical location and the reader’s mental dictionary, children might not be familiar with some words. My child had no clue what a dungaree was until they saw the photo. 

Review submitted on 10/6/22

 

Heart Rating System:
1 (lowest) and 5 (highest) 
Score: ❤❤❤

Amazon Purchase Link

 

 

Meet the Author

Lainey Dee was born in Birmingham and raised in Kidderminster. Lainey is a accredited nanny and holds the NNEB certificate. She presently takes care of a pair of twins. Lainey is a big art deco fan and her home is decorated in that period style.

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