Tag Archives: animals

When Your Feet Hit the Street, You Gotta Look Around! by Gabriella Fantoccini (Book Review)

Kids should look both ways before crossing the street, but what about when they are actually in the street?

When my daughter was little, she would make a big show out of looking both ways BEFORE crossing the street, but when she was actually in the street, she completely zoned out.

I was concerned that somehow she might wind up in the street one day when I wasn’t around, so I came up with the memory aid, “When Your Feet Hit the Street, You Gotta Look Around!”

It worked!

Whenever her feet were in the street, she was aware that she had to keep looking around until she safely reached the sidewalk.

“When Your Feet Hit the Street, You Gotta Look Around!” is a memory aid turned into a SUPER FUN children’s book based on a children’s song I also wrote.

A free download of the song is included with the book.

Have fun singing along with your little ones as you turn the pages, reminding them to look left, look right, look all around!

You can listen to the song and see the lyrics in a video at…

https://www.fantoccinibooks.com/video

 
 
 
 
I received a complimentary copy of this book from Reedsy Discovery. I voluntarily chose to read and post an honest review.
 
“When Your Feet Hit the Street, You Gotta Look Around!” reinvents the vital life lesson “Look both ways before crossing the street” in a fun way with animal characters to educate and entertain young listeners/readers. Using this phrase on repeat – “When your feet hit the street, you gotta look around.” – in conjunction with darling illustrations created by Geraldine Nunez, kids will learn the proper way to cross a street. 

Since children have personal phones at an early age, this book points out not to text or stare at your cell when your feet step off the curb. It’s good practice not to text and walk in general. Head up is what I tell my kiddos all the time. 

The story also suggests holding an adult’s hand when stepping off the curb and crossing a street. It’s precisely how my family crosses the road. 

“When Your Feet Hit the Street, You Gotta Look Around!” is a memory aid turned into a SUPER FUN children’s book based on a children’s song Gabriella Fantoccini wrote. Great news – you’ll receive a FREE MP3 Download of the song with every purchase. What a marvelous gift from the author! Now, if you’re wondering if you’re following the right beat, guess no further. Be ready for an earworm because I think you and your family will sing this song a lot! Oh, I’d like to note the lyrics are in the back of the book. 

Amazon’s recommended reading age for When Your Feet Hit the Street, You Gotta Look Around! is 3 – 8 years (grade level: preschool – 3); however, I think toddlers might enjoy the catchy tune. Let’s start teaching them street safety at an early age! 

I will recommend this book to my school’s librarian and fellow elementary school parents. It’s a book that should be read often! 

 

Heart Rating System:
1 (lowest) and 5 (highest) 
Score: ❤❤❤

Amazon Purchase Link

 

 

Meet the Author

Hello!

When my daughter was little, she would make a big show of looking both ways BEFORE crossing the street, BUT when she was actually crossing in the street, she completely zoned out.

I was concerned that somehow she might wind up in the street by herself one day, so I came up with the memory aid, “When Your Feet Hit the Street, You Gotta Look Around!”

It worked! She remembered!

One day, I pulled out my guitar and the phrase became a song, and then eventually the song became this children’s book.

I hope you and your little one(s) stay safe and enjoy the book and the FREE MP3 song download.

And please check out my website at…

Website Link
Reedsy Author Link

 

 

 

 

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Adventure Emu by R.C. Chizhov (Book Review)

Fasten your seatbelts for a tornado, funfair and adventure!

An emu whines about his mundane life and wishes for a grand adventure.

One day, a tornado whisks him away to a funfair! Life is as thrilling as it gets, but can the flightless emu find his way back home?

 

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(review request submitted by the author for an honest critique) 

 

My family lives in an area with a threat of tornadoes every fall and spring. Heck, we’ve also been under warning for one during the wintertime. Crazy, but true! Therefore, my kiddos are well aware of the dangers—the destruction they cause. Even though my family has gone over our “tornado preparedness” plan several times, we went over it again. I encourage you to go over yours if you live in an area with twisters. If you don’t, maybe go over fire or earthquake instead; whatever disaster might strike your location.

One kiddo’s first remark about Adventure Emu was, “They wish our tornadoes took people to a carnival cause carnivals are fun.” My other child made an ick face regarding the kale and romaine lettuce. They said, “Who would pick salad over popcorn and nachos?” Their question led to a great discussion about the dietary needs of animals and humans. 

Since our town has a carnival every Fourth of July, we discussed the differences between Emu’s festival and ours. My children wish ours had a roller coaster and bumper cars. Me too; those are a lot of fun. 

Adventure Emu by R.C. Chizhov is a fun story that I’m sure your kids will love to read. Anastasia Yezhela once again knocks it out of the park with their illustrations. Congrats to both of you for creating a book my family loved, and I’m sure many others will too.

 

Heart Rating System:
1 (lowest) and 5 (highest) 
Score:  ❤ 

Amazon Purchase Link

 

About R.C. Chizhov

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R.C. Chizhov grew up in India, moved to New York in 2005 and spent fourteen years as an investment banker before pursuing her childhood dream of becoming an author. She now lives in Florida with her ever-supportive husband and ever- energetic son. She is a member of SCBWI.

Website Link

Instagram: @rcchizhov

 

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Hoo’s Driving the Bus by Nikki Estridge (Book Review)


The day of the biggest baseball game of the season is here, but Gigi the giraffe and her teammates might not make it – their team’s bus has no driver! Can Gigi come up with a plan to save the day?

Amazon Purchase Link

 

I received a complimentary copy of this book from Reedsy Discovery. I voluntarily chose to read and post an honest review.

 

What a fun cover! Each animal had its own personality/expression, which I found delightful. The inside contents were just as spectacular. We loved Gigi Giraffe. Their morning routine resembles many city children who have an early game to attend and make a mad dash to catch the bus. However, I’m sure when your child reaches the bus, their driver is there. Thank goodness for that!

In Hoo’s Driving the Bus by Nikki Estridge, the bus driver had an emergency. Animals/ball players were frantic. If they don’t find a driver soon, they’ll be late for the game. This means they would forfeit the biggest game of the season. EEK! 

Gigi Giraffe asks for a volunteer. Each teammate declined to drive in a way fitting for their animalistic nature. For example, the cat was “purr-fectly petrified” to drive. The dog stated they were “barking up the wrong tree,” asking him to take the wheel. 

Gigi Giraffe was left with no choice but to drive the bus. Oh, my goodness, Gigi Giraffe’s driving was terrible, which means kids will most assuredly laugh during the driving parts. The animal faces will amuse your child; they did mine. We liked Howard Horse and the frightened pig the most. 

Gigi Giraffe’s parking skills were no better than their driving skills, which caused my youngster to laugh (again). Hoo’s Driving the Bus had my daughter smiling for almost the entire book. They asked if I could buy it. I think I shall! (Note: We were given a reviewer file)

The illustrations by Syama Mithun elevated the already humorous story. 

Whether your child is a listener or an active reader, I encourage you to share Hoo’s Driving the Bus by Nikki EstridgeI plan on recommending this book to all my parenting groups for children two years and up. 

 

Heart Rating System:
1 (lowest) and 5 (highest) 
Score: 

Amazon Purchase Link

 

 

About the Author

Nikki Estridge is an American actress, writer, director and producer. She played collegiate softball for the University of Tennessee Lady Volunteers and graduated with high honors.

As an advocate for autism awareness and a person of multi-ethnic background, diversity, inclusion and equality are of the utmost importance to Nikki. She is very committed to her work with various charities and support networks.

Nikki is a sixteen-time IMDb-qualifying festival award winner most notably for her comedy short, ‘Don’t Make It Awkward,’ which she wrote, directed, produced, cast and starred in. Nikki is best known for her roles on Queen Sugar, Law and Order: SVU, and House of Cards. She is also the author of soon-to-be-published children’s book ‘Hoo’s Driving The Bus?’.

Reedsy Link

Website Link

 

 

 

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Saving the Seas for the Purple and Green: A Story of Cleaning Up the Ocean by Nancy Carlisle (Book Review)

SAVING THE SEA FOR THE PURPLE AND GREEN by Nancy Carlisle

 
A young girl loves the tide pools that she sees on her runs by the oceans, but one day notices garbage amongst the colorful creatures she finds there. Along the beach she meets conservationists cleaning up the beach who educate her about the dangers that trash pose to ocean life. She decides to help also.
 
Buy the Book:
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add to goodreads
 
 
I received a complimentary copy of this book from iRead Book Tours. I voluntarily chose to read and post an honest review.
 
Every day, we see the effects humans are having on the planet. We are jeopardizing many habitats through our pollution and overuse of products. Oceans, lakes, streams, and rivers are home to incredible creatures and need protection from us humans. Saving the Seas for the Purple and Green: A Story of Cleaning Up the Ocean by Nancy Carlisle points out how the plastics we use find their way into the waters.


We depend on certain products to make our life easier, but we don’t always consider how these items affect our water friends. In Saving the Seas for the Purple and Green: A Story of Cleaning Up the Ocean, several people have shined a light on water pollution and, through their efforts, hope to save as many water lives as possible. For example, at nine, Milo started the Skip the Straw movement. Thanks to his efforts, restaurants use fewer plastic straws, like many consumers at home. 


Many people have developed inventions to help trap garbage. My daughter and I had recently learned about Boyan Slat and his system of trapping plastic. Other people found creative ways to show people the amount of trash that accumulates in our waters daily: artwork and clothing/accessories made from recycled ocean trash.


We must teach our children the importance of reducing, reusing, and recycling. We also need to remind them not to litter. Heck, adults need to remember this as well. We are the biggest threat to the environment. 


Surfboard creator Taylor Lane’s documentary is coming out this fall about the ocean pollution problem. (To find the date and time, check online.) I plan to watch it with my family, and I hope you will too.
 

Heart Rating System:
1 (lowest) and 5 (highest) 
Score: 
❤❤
 
 
 
 
 
Meet the Author:
Author Nancy Carlisle
 
Nancy Carlisle is and author and illustrator who writes hopeful books for kids that interweave facts and fiction about the environment and global responsibility. During her 38-year career as a sustainable architect and researcher, her focus was on the environment. She led work nationally and internationally on sustainable and energy efficient buildings and communities and won awards for collaboratively designing award-winning sustainable buildings, a laboratory campus, and improving the energy efficiency of U.S. laboratories. Since retiring, Nancy has worked as a volunteer teaching English as a Second Language and mentors first generation college students. She is a strong advocate against plastic waste not only because it pollutes our oceans and water but also because it contributes CO2 to our atmosphere.
 
​Nancy enjoys the outdoors and international travel. She is a member of the Society of Children’s Book Writers and Illustrators and the Society of Environmental Journalists. She studies botanical illustrating and French language. 
 
connect with the author: website
 
 
 
 
 
 

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Reina Visits the Butterfly Garden: Learn about nature, insects and butterflies in a fun way! by Sheila C. Duperrier (Book Review)

The mountains and valleys around town are filled with trees, flowers, and gorgeous insects of all kinds. Reina visits the town’s butterfly garden…

Reina is a smart and sensitive young girl who loves nature, but she is afraid of insects. Will she always be afraid? Will she conquer her fear?

Join Reina on this journey and discover the importance of insects especially butterflies, and her process of learning about her favorite ones! This charming children’s book is designed to make your child become a butterfly expert! Let’s start learning along with Reina and having fun!

  • A rhyming children’s book to learn nice things about the butterfly garden
  • Fun learning for children: explore nature, insects, butterflies
  • Filled with colorful illustrations to both entertain and educate
  • For children of all backgrounds – Reading to your child
  • Also available in FrenchHaitian Creole, and Spanish
  • Search the accompanying workbook for more fun: Reina Visits the Butterfly Garden – Activity Bo

Amazon Purchase Link

 

 

I received a complimentary copy of this book from Reedsy Discovery. I voluntarily chose to read and post an honest review.

 

Reina Visits the Butterfly Garden: Learn about nature, insects and butterflies in a fun way! by Sheila Duperrier had many lovely qualities that’ll make it a hit with little kids. First, K.K.P. Dananjali illustrated so many beautiful butterflies. They came in many colors and sizes. The author, Sheila Duperrier, names some species: Monarchs, Gray Hairstreaks, Cassius Blue, Cloudless Sulphurs, and Swallowtails. I think the author should’ve asked the illustrator to create a page with the various butterflies mentioned in the story under their proper name. That way, when kids go outside to play and see a familiar butterfly, they know what it is and maybe tell others so they can know its name too. 

Children will learn many facts regarding butterflies, such as they taste with their feet, they drink from a “straw,” and their life cycle. The life cycle material is too advanced for two-year-olds (minimum recommended reading age) to retain. However, eight-year-olds (Amazon’s max age) should be able to understand each step in the cycle.

Reina Visits the Butterfly Garden lists several questions for the listener to ponder. These questions are directly related to the life cycle chart. The chart shouldn’t be complex for preschoolers to understand. You’ll have to simplify “chrysalis,” though. 

Note: There are words in bold throughout the story. These keywords are defined in the glossary after the story. There’s also a scan code redirecting you to the author’s site. 

My family enjoyed Reina Visits the Butterfly Garden by Sheila Duperrie very much. My daughter loved every butterfly illustrated. She pointed out all her favorites, those with a speck of purple in them. We also counted the butterflies to bring more education into the story. 

After reading the story, we looked up ways to attract more butterflies into our yard. She’s hoping she’ll see some from the book. Me too. 

 

Heart Rating System:
1 (lowest) and 5 (highest) 
Score: ❤❤

Amazon Purchase Link

 

 

Meet the Author

Sheila is a former kindergarten teacher who taught children… Sheila is well aware of the dangers of social media on young minds today. To that end, she has created a series of books to engage children from a young age. Teaching, entertaining, and instilling good values is her mission.

Reedsy Link

 

 

 

 

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