Tag Archives: educational

Pebbles and the Biggest Number by Joey Benun (Book Review)

What’s the BIGGEST number?

Pebbles the butterfly wants to know! He travels the world in search of the answer, asking every animal he meets.

Along the way, he must escape an earthquake, outrun an avalanche, and fly over a tsunami. Luckily, his new friends are there to lend him a hand . . . or a paw.

Will Pebbles ever find the biggest number?

Flutter in and find out!

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I received a complimentary copy of this book from Reedsy Discovery. I voluntarily chose to read and post an honest review.

 

In this adorable tale, Pebbles wants to know what is the best number, so the butterfly takes flight in search of the answer. Every page weaves educational and fun facts during Pebbles’s visit to various locations: desert, tropical rainforest, the beach, snowy mountains, and even space. 

Children will walk away from this book with a greater knowledge of many science, math, and animal facts. Maybe even adults will learn a thing or two as well! For example: “The hottest recorded temperature on Earth was 134 degrees Fahrenheit (57 degrees Celsius). It was measured in a California desert on July 10, 1913.” I didn’t know the following fun fact: “A standard American light bulb uses 120 volts of electricity. That means an electric eel could power 5 light bulbs.” And this math fact will blow children’s minds: “1 octillion has 27 zeros. It looks like this: 1,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000.”

I don’t want to disclose every fun fact, but the following science fact was fascinating, with droughts reported worldwide. “Most thunderstorm clouds hold more than 4 billion cups (1 billion liters) of water. Two of these clouds could provide every person on Earth with one cup of water!” 

Children, parents, and educators will adore Pebbles and the Biggest by Joey Benun for many reasons. It has stunning illustrations, a storyline that draws in the reader, and it educates as it entertains young minds (5 and older). While the text is too difficult for babies and toddlers, I bet they’ll still love looking at the beautifully drawn images by Laura Watson. There are so many to admire, each more stunning than the last. 

Pebbles and the Biggest Number has components that reach a wide variety of age groups, but I would recommend this lovely book to school-age children for overall comprehension. Finally, I would suggest reading “Dig Deeper,” which addresses the terminology and numbers in the story. 

 

Heart Rating System:
1 (lowest) and 5 (highest) 
Score: ❤❤❤

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Meet the Author

Joey Benun has always thought BIG. His fascination with numbers began when he was five years old—the bigger, the better. Years later, a fortuitous conversation with his niece and nephews inspired him to write a book about BIG numbers for little kids. Thus, Pebbles and the Biggest Number was born

Reedsy Author Link

 

 

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Come and Play! Exploring Animal Friends by Heidi Dehncke (Book Review)

Kids love animals — and they love picture books about animals, too. Come and Play! Exploring Animal Friends takes children on a tour of fifteen types of animal friends. Discover what makes pandas, raccoons, spiders, cats, and frogs unique (just to name a few). Whether or how they play, and what makes them special. While this children’s animal book gives interesting and surprising facts, it is the original illustrations which makes this book a treasure. The animal illustrations magnify the beauty and distinctive qualities of each creature. Ultimately, kids learn they share many similarities with animals (both feelings and behavior), and they learn about the world around them.

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I received a complimentary copy of this book from Reedsy Discovery.
I voluntarily chose to read and post an honest review.

 

I had mixed feelings regarding Come and Play! Exploring Animal Friends by Heidi Dehncke. I loved the facts about various animals and insects. There was a lot of information that might be NEW to most children. 

Examples: “Raccoon” is an adopted Powhatan word meaning “animals that scratches with its hands.” While spiders don’t like to play, some play dead. I knew that raccoon tidbit, but I did not know the spider information. That just proves even adults can learn something new with Come and Play! Exploring Animal Friends, and that’s a beautiful thing.

While I adored all the facts presented in the book, I wasn’t a huge fan of all the images. Some drawings were lovely, such as the bald eagle bust, elephants, penguins, and butterflies. On the other hand, there were some that I didn’t particularly care for, and neither did my daughter: the peek-a-boo frog and the first primate page, for instance. 

Amazon’s recommended reading age is 3 – 9 years (Grade level: Preschool – 4). I think everyone in that bracket can benefit from the content. Three-year-olds might not fully grasp (retain) the information as quickly as a nine-year-old, but that’s okay. If you read Come and Play! Exploring Animal Friends time and again, one day, they’ll tell you the facts before you have a chance to read them. 

 

Heart Rating System:
1 (lowest) and 5 (highest) 
Score: ❤❤

Amazon Purchase Link

 

 

I originally attended Pratt Institute for illustration. Then I became a self taught editor and multimedia producer. I received my MS in journalism from Columbia University in 2000 and made the film Dust to Dust: The Health Effects of 9/11, (Sundance Channel, 2006). I also pursue fine art painting. 

Reedsy Link

 

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