Tag Archives: dancing

Mambo and Murder:  A Fiona Quinn Mystery #6 by C.S. McDonald (Book Review)

 

Three ballroom dancers had been murdered over forty-years ago. Wow, that’s one old cold case. What’s more, the murderer thought to have been killed during a police chase has resurfaced in Pittsburgh. Yikes! How can that be?Worse, ballroom dancing simply isn’t Detective Nathan Landry’s forte. After weeks of practice, Nathan still has two left-feet. Can Fiona step in to guide Nathan through this dancing debacle or will it take forty-years for the detective to find his footing? Double yikes!Join Fiona and Detective Landry in this high-stepping whodunit!

 

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I received a complimentary copy of this book from iRead Book Tours. I voluntarily chose to read and post an honest review.
 
 
Right out of the gate (Prologue), we had a crime on our hands! While Nathan was investigating the burglary, secrets buried long ago came forth. Did Vincent Di Volante really die 40+ years ago in a fiery car wreck? If not, who did?
 
If these two questions were enough to wet your whistle, Fiona and the people in the neighborhood have been getting mail postmarked back in the 70s. I know mail runs slow, but that gives a new definition to “snail mail.”

I think it’s worth noting, Mambo and Murder: A Fiona Quinn Mystery (book #6 in the series) by C.S. McDonald is NOT just adults. Since there are no curse words or suggestive scenes, it’s perfectly acceptable for teens and young adults to read it. As a family who loves playing clue, this book is right up our alley, and I’m thrilled to share it with my teen. 

Oh, and BTW, I love the cover! 
 

 
Heart Rating System:
1 (lowest) and 5 (highest) 
Score: 

 
 
 
 
Meet the Author: 
For twenty-six years C.S. McDonald’s life whirled around a song and a dance. Classically trained at Pittsburgh Ballet Theater School, The Pittsburgh Dance Alloy, and many others, she became a professional dancer and choreographer. During that time, she choreographed many musicals and an opera for the Pittsburgh Savoyards. In 2011 she retired from her dance career to write. Under her real name, Cindy McDonald, she writes murder-suspense and romantic suspense novels. In 2014 she added the pen name, C.S. McDonald, to write children’s books for her grandchildren. In 2016 she added the Fiona Quinn Mysteries to that expansion. She decided to write the cozy mystery series that everyone, including teens and tweens, can read and enjoy. Presently, the Fiona Quinn Mysteries nine books with a tenth slated for 2021. The books are also available on audio, narrated by Maren Swenson Waxenberg. Cindy’s newest venture is The Owl’s Nest Mysteries. Once again, she has set her cozy mystery in Pittsburgh. The female protagonist, Alexa Owl, is much different from Fiona Quinn. The Owl’s Next Mysteries has a little grit, a little time travel, a little romance, and a whole lot of cozy! Ms. McDonald resides on her Thoroughbred farm known as Fly by Night Stables near Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, with her husband, Bill, and her poorly behaved Cocker Spaniel, Allister.
 
 
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Website  ~  Twitter  ~  Facebook
 
 
 
 

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The Bashful Frying Pan: Kitchen Tales by Cecília Vizvári (Book Review)

Book One

Age Level: 3 – 12

Paperback: 53 pages

 

From the first part of the kitchen tales you learn how the most conceited teapot becomes the nicest and friendliest teapot in the world. Of course the tea cups, garlic press, cake-server, kitchen sponge, and not to be forgotten, the leftover chocolate sauce, also play their part.


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Book Two

Age Level: 3 – 12

Print Length: 50 pages

 

In the second part of the Kitchen Tales we can read about how the Bashful Frying Pan started to sing for the first time. Why did he break into a song all of a sudden? What did the Haughty Teapot say, and what about the garlic press and the cake-server? Were they also surprised? Read the tale!

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(review request submitted by the author for an honest critique) 

 

The Bashful Frying Pan was read by me (40+) and my daughter (11). Below are our thoughts on the story. 

We love to have music playing while we cook. It makes dinner prep go by in a snap! Therefore, we enjoyed watching the kitchen helpers get into the groove. Adorable! 

The overall storyline was cute. We didn’t have issues with it, but we did have some with the illustrations and dialogue based on the book’s recommended age level (3 – 12) and grade level (P – 5).

In my opinion, the illustrations were more geared for pre-k or first and second graders. My eleven-year-old thought the images were a bit creepy. She didn’t think kids her age would read this book. 

We also agreed that not many younger kids would know some of the words as in their meaning, or pronunciation: (examples) ratatouille, exquisite, unprecedented, and haughty. She didn’t even know what haughty meant and, again, she’s eleven. 

We’d still recommend this book to parents who have siblings in the 3-12 age bracket. The older child can help the younger sibling read and learn new words. 

 

Heart Rating System:

1 (lowest) and 5 (highest) 

Score:  

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Book Three

Age Level: 4 – 12

Print Length: 43 pages

In the third part of the Kitchen Tales you will learn how the Kettle In Love has succeeded to win the heart of the Haughty Teapot.Remember, it’s not just anybody. He has to conquer the Haughty Teapot!!! It was also necessary for the spider to give good advice, with a lot of ingenuity and patience, until he was successful.I will not reveal the details, read the tale!

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Cecília began writing stories and tales when her children were born. As the number of her children grew, the number of tales increased as well. The children discovered that it was great fun to invent new stories and tales, thus her older kids write and illustrate tales. Cecília’s smaller children only test stories. Since their name is Watercastle in English, they publish their tales under the name Watercastle Tale Works. The parents live with their five kids in Hungary.

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